Office Supplies

How to Recycle Your Printer

recycle your printer

What to do with your old printer

The recent boom in personal electronic ownership has created a new problem that many folks did not anticipate: old printers and electronics ending up in landfills and leaking environmentally unfriendly chemicals into the ground. The solution to this issue is to recycle and reuse electronics that we don't need or don't use. Here are just a few easy-to-implement options for your old printer. Think green, everyone!

Corporate Recycling Programs

We usually don't think of corporations stepping up to the plate to do right by Mother Earth, but in the case of Hewlett-Packard, that's exactly what they are doing. The good people at HP have a series of options that will keep your printer out of the landfill. You can offer your printer as a trade-in, working or not, towards the purchase of a new printer. According to HP, you can get as much as $700 off on your next purchase. If your old printer is particularly old, they will take your printer and recycle it for you at no cost. No matter which option you choose, HP is helping all of us keep dangerous printer toxins out of landfills. For more information, click here.

Local Big Box Stores

If you happen to live near a Staples office supply store, you have a pair of options available to you. Much like the HP deal, you can trade in your old printer for credit towards a new one (at press time, the deal was for a $50 towards a printer priced at $200 or more) or you can simply drop off your neglected old printer and they'll recycle it. If you happen to have a Dell brand printer, they'll take care of it for free. Otherwise, they do charge a small recycling fee (usually $10); a small price to pay to keep harmful chemicals out of our water system. For more information on the Staples program, click here.

The Old Donation Box

Not only are there a whole host of non-profits that could benefit from your old-but-still-functioning printer, there are also a bunch of thrift stores who could, as well. Many thrift stores, like the Salvation Army, do charity work with the profits made from their stores. If you need further motivation, these donations are often tax deductible. Just ask for a receipt.